Colcannon

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Colcannon is a traditional Irish potato dish made with mashed potatoes, leafy greens such as cabbage or kale, leeks or green onions and plenty of good Irish butter. I served this with my Beef and Guinness Stew

Colcannon

Recipe Source: A Vintage Kitchen

  • 3 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 4 strips bacon, diced
  • 2 leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned well and sliced thinly
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups finely chopped green cabbage, about 1/2 head
  • 2 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 1/4 cup butter, preferably an Irish butter such as Kerrygold
  • approx. 1 1/4 cups warmed milk
  • sea salt and pepper to taste
  1. Cook potatoes in cold, salted water until very tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Drain well.
  2. Meanwhile in a large skillet cook bacon over medium-low heat until crisp. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel.
  3. Add leeks and cabbage to the pan. Cook until the vegetables are softened 6 to 8 minutes. Add the garlic and green onions and cook an additional minute.
  4. With a potato masher, mash potatoes, adding the butter and warmed milk.
  5. Stir in remaining ingredients. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Beef and Guinness Stew

 

Beef and Guinness Stew – A hearty stew slowly simmered for hours in a rich, deeply flavored broth until the beef is melt-in-your-mouth-tender. Guinness Stout Beer adds an incredible depth of flavor. 

 

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One of my all-time favorite meals is beef stew. It is so cozy and comforting, especially on a cold day. I never really make it the same way twice; sometimes I add red wine, sometimes I add Cognac. As St. Patrick’s Day is coming up, I thought it would be a great time to try Guinness Beer. Well, I have found my new favorite addition to beef stew!

Dark, malty, Guinness beer adds a deep, rich, complex flavor to a classic beef stew. Even if you are not a fan of beer, I think you will still really love this stew. I served this with  Colcannon

Beef and Guinness Stew

Recipe Source: A Vintage Kitchen

  • 2 1/2 lbs. chuck roast, cut into  1″ to 2 ” pieces
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • cooking oil
  • 2 large onions, sliced thinly
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 Tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 – 12oz. bottle Guinness beer
  • 3 cups beef stock
  • 1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 Tablespoon Balsamic vinegar
  •  sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 large carrots, chopped into 1″ pieces
  • 3 stalks of celery, chopped into 1″ pieces
  • 3 1/2 cups potatoes, chopped into 1″ pieces (or other root vegetables such as; turnip, celery root, rutabaga, sweet potato)
  • 1 large parsnip, chopped into 1″ pieces

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Cut the beef into 1″ to 2″ pieces. Pat dry the beef with a paper towel, and season well with salt and pepper.
  2. In a large pot, heat a couple of tablespoons of cooking oil over medium-high heat. Add the beef in small batches and brown well on all sides. Remove beef from the pot and set aside. Lower the heat if the beef is browning too quickly.
  3. Reduce the heat and add the onions and cook until the onions are starting to caramelize, about 10 – 15 minutes.
  4. Add the garlic and tomato paste and cook for a couple of minutes.
  5. Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables and cook while stirring, for another couple of minutes.
  6. Whisk in the Guinness and stir and scrape the pot with a wooden spoon to lift off all of those yummy brown bits off the bottom of the pot.
  7. Add the seared beef, beef stock, Worcestershire, brown sugar, Balsamic vinegar, dry mustard, and herbs to the pot.
  8. Bring to a boil, cover and reduce heat to low and simmer for about 1 1/2 hours.
  9. Add the remaining vegetables and simmer until the beef is very tender, about 30 to 45 minutes longer. Remove the bay leaves and thyme stems. Yields: about 8 servings

 

NOTE:  This stew freezes well, provided it is made without potatoes. Potatoes don’t generally freeze well, especially larger chunks of potatoes.